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Trends and Insights from the Pega Community

Agile Metrics Can Help Measure Improvement

By its nature, Agile doesn’t have any defined measurements or metrics. However, there are numerous proposed metrics that teams can adopt from other Agile professionals. These range from ones measuring bygone performances to ones that will provide insight about how a particular change has turned out in reality.

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What is a Hackathon?

In February, Pega held its 7th Hackathon – a 24-hour developer sprint where teams chose projects to improve our software and/or internal processes. You can read about it on pega.com, including our advice on how to run your own hackathon. This event always stirs up interest, and so we want to use this space to answer some more of the questions we frequently get regarding hackathons.

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A Scrum Master is a REACTive Change Agent

Every leader has a different management style. Some leaders react to a situation after it happens  in order to reach desired outcome. Some leaders anticipate a situation and plan their actions to reach the desired outcome.

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If you value success, set clear goals and cultivate discipline

The Scrum Guide lists five values that each and every Scrum Team member must live by – commitment, courage, focus, openness, and respect – and leaves the team space for personal experience. From my personal experience, I can say that discipline is important to success, and a virtue that only emerges when you incorporate the five scrum values. Most importantly, discipline always thrives on clearly stated goals.

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Making Agile Management Meaningful

In the past, one of my favorite go-tos when exploring the web was Quora, the popular question and answer site. I would read through a lot of high quality answers by subject and domain experts; perfect for when I had some time on my hands during the boring commute to work. One day I saw a highly rated answer on my feed, and began to read through it without paying attention to the author’s name. I glanced at the author name and was stunned to see the Quora profile of US President Obama.

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Bridging the Gap Between Agile Development and UX Design

Why is there still such a divide between people who develop and people who design? With communication apps like Slack and HipChat abounding, you’d think it would be a breeze to keep teams talking. Shouldn’t we all know how to go about this with the success of methods like Design Thinking, Scrum, and Kanban?

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Reducing the Uphill Struggle to Build Great UIs with Pega 7.3.1

The project failed partly because the designers didn’t fully consider practicality. This wasn’t a software project, though, and it happened long ago. Nevertheless, this project failure provides a lesson that we can apply to UI design today. Mostly completed by 1806 and terminating in the Massachusetts towns of Cambridge and Concord, the Cambridge and Concord Turnpike was purposely designed and implemented in a veritable straight line between the two towns, which are roughly 14 miles apart.

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Rules, Guardrails, and Naming Conventions: a Pega Best Practice

What's in a name? Sometimes we forget to stress the importance of naming guardrails when discussing guardrail design. Rule naming is one of the most crucial players in Pega Platform application design. In my experience of interacting with various developers, I've noticed that following proper naming conventions is probably one of the most ignored areas in the Pega application development cycle. There are a good deal of rules which are heavily used during development, yet aren't paid much attention when it comes to naming conventions and consistency.

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Boosting Product Owner Engagement with your Scrum Team

How involved is your Product Owner when it comes to your Scrum team?

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Taming the Legacy Code Dragon

Is technical debt compromising your team's sprint commitments? Sometimes we need a process change. We are Agile, after all. There are 12 principles outlined on the Agile Manifesto. Two of these principles are:

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